Posted on Leave a comment

How To Attach Cuffs Sewing Tutorial

How To Attach Cuffs Sewing Tutorial

Following on from our neckband tutorial, we thought it’d be useful to make a cuffs tutorial too.

We have 2 examples here, one is made with jersey and on a relaxed cuff, the other on a teeny baby cuff with ribbing as some people find that easier.

Many people find cuffs a better alternative to hemming as it can be easier and give a neater finish without having to struggle with hemming.

Purple Jersey was used with our Rainbow Rockets for these pjs and our Rainbow Hills with Red Ribbing for the baby garment.

You can either use Cotton Jersey or Ribbing for the cuffs, both have excellent stretch and return which is key when creating cuffs.

Caboodle recommends ribbing for beginners as it’s a lot more forgiving and you will find it easier to get the finish you want.

Remember, if you buy four items, so for example four half meters of any ribbing, or more, you’ll start to get multi buy discount, the more you buy, the cheaper it gets. There’s also a discount, specifically for first time buyers who are members of the MBJM sewing group on Facebook. (This coupon is not valid in conjunction with multi buy discount categories).

Cut your cuff to the dimensions it says in your pattern. If using our ribbing then you need to ensure that the stretch is across the pattern piece. This will enable the cuff to stretch over the hand of foot. If you get it the wrong way around then it wont expand to go over the wearer.

With jersey this direction is less important as it is usually 4 way stretch. What you are looking for is the room for the cuff to expand.

Here is how to check your ribbing is cut the right way:

When your Caboodle Textiles ribbing arrives it will come as a tube. The outside will be a relatively smooth surface while the inside will have clearly visible lines running across the width.

Keep your ribbing in front of you with the tube running up and down. You can see on this image below how different types of ribbing cuts will look on the tubular rib.  Your pattern may come with pattern pieces or require you to measure the size of cuff required. All of these items are shown folded as they would be cut on the fold. The tubular ribbing enables you to position your pattern piece at the fold and cut double width at once.

When you have your ribbing cut and folded right sides together you will be able to see the lines running across the width of the cuff.

You can check this by stretching it before sewing at the side.

Sometimes your cut cuff piece unfolded is almost a square. This means when you fold it to sew you may accidentally fold it incorrectly. If the lines run downwards in the same direction as you about to sew then you have folded it the wrong way. Unfold it and re do. This is easier to do before you’ve sewn it!

If you have cut your cuffs from jersey then they may not already be double folded so you’ll need to check you fold them with the correct sides together.

Once you have your pieces cut take one piece at a time.  Lay your piece in front of you right side up.  Then take the left edge and fold it over to meet the right edge.  This means you should now have the correct side of the fabric hidden.

Now sew together in a ring with right sides facing.

Once the cuff is in a ring, open it out and fold it wrong sides together in half, so you’ve got a ring, that’s now half thickness. You’ve basically reduced the height of your cuff and hidden the seam you’ve just sewn. You now have the correct side of the fabric on show.

Now you’re going to divide your cuff into four equal parts. We use wonder clips to do this as they’re easier to control than pins and you don’t end up poking yourself a hundred times!

Pop a clip at the seam, then fold in half and pop a clip exactly opposite. Then bring the clips together so they’re touching each other than at each end put another clip. Make sure the clips are on the raw edges – you can press if you want to add a bit more security.

Next you take your item and we’re going to do the same thing again.

At this point you need to pay attention to the way up you have your cuffs if they have a directional print on them. You are going to sew in the cuff in what appears to be upside down.  Once the cuff is sewn it then unfold out of the arm/leg changing the direction of the cuff. If you are unsure if you have it the right way you can clip it in and then gently check the direction by peeping inside the item.

To clip your cuff to the main fabric:

Find the four equal points of your sleeve or leg simply find the seam and mark it.  Then do the same opposite, fold so the clips match and clip the 2 other edges. Be really careful about making sure the garment is split into four equal parts as it will cause problems with the distribution of the stretch further in the tutorial. The reason you’re doing it like this is because you want that cuff to stretch evenly throughout all of the fabric. If you don’t do it like this, you will end up stretching one part more than the other. And that’s when it will start looking wonky, you’ll run out of cuff or it won’t lay flat.

Now you need to match up the clips on your cuff with the clips on your garment, making sure the raw edges match. Combine all layers under one clip. Line up the seams on the cuff with the seams on your garment.

When you’re a beginner, some people suggest dividing it into eight and doing it that way just again so that you get a really even finish.

Now you have your cuff pinned, you’ll see that the cuff is shorter than the garment – how short depends on the garment you’re making, some sleeves are relaxed so won’t be as short – so as you are sewing you will want to stretch the cuff but not the garment – this is absolutely crucial otherwise you will overstretch the cuff and end up with a wobbly circle that wont sit flat.

You can sew your cuff on an overlocker or a sewing machine – use an overcast stitch, triple stretch or zig zag.

Practise on scraps first to ensure you’re completely comfortable before sewing for the first time on your garment.

It’s really important that you put the cuff part that you want to stretch on the underneath and the garment on top. You can change the angle if you like as shown in the video below, some people may find different angles easier.

These images show you preparing to sew.

Ensure your needle is fully down and in when stretching the next step or you can bend or snap your needle, pull on the ribbing or jersey, which is the bit that’s allowed to stretch. And you know how far to pull by the amount that the ribbing needs to stretch between where you’ve started, and the next clip.

Begin sewing just before your seam clips as it will help keep the seams aligned.

Stretch the ribbing, and then just rest the garment on to the top so all the layers rest together and put your finger where the clip was so it holds the stretched ribbing and the garment together.  As you’re sewing and the feed dogs bring the material through, you’re going to keep those two points together where the cuff is stretched, but the garment isn’t.

And as that goes under the foot, you’re then going to do the next bit of fabric, again use your bottom hand to stretch the cuff, while the top hand stabilizes the garment and keeps the two in the right place.

When making tiny cuffs, particularly ankle cuffs which are tighter some people prefer to sew their cuff the other way up on the machine. This is what it would look like.  We don’t recommend it as it is harder to see the layers are all stretched correctly but some people do find it easier this way.  If you are struggling you could try this way up with some scraps to find what suits you.

Keep going until you reach back to where you began and finish the seam.

Once you’ve finished you can press the cuff to help any lines or puckers. If you are happy as it is then no pressing is required.

Remember, perseverance and practise makes perfect!

Don’t forget to share your cuffs (and other sewing!) in our Facebook group.

Happy Sewing

Posted on 1 Comment

Sewing To Sell – A Guide To Starting A Sewing Business

Sewing To Sell – A Guide To Starting A Sewing Business

Recently in our Facebook group we’ve had lots of questions about turning a sewing hobby into a fully fledged business – there’s lots of things to consider and know about before embarking on that journey so we asked for the expertise of Ana from Virtual Bird.

Some of you may know Ana as one of the admins in our Facebook group as well as the tech expert for Caboodle, when she’s not making Caboodle magic happen, Ana works with small businesses to help them achieve their full potential with her services and free small business support group.

Without further ado, here’s Ana with her top tips for setting up a sewing business.

Guide To Turning Your Hobby Into A Business

It’s really exciting that you’re thinking about turning your hobby into a business but it can be overwhelming to find everything you need to begin the journey. There’s a lot of information you need to know and things to do to get set up.

So I’m really happy to be sharing this guide with you in conjunction with Caboodle Textiles.

Research Research Research 

One of the first things you need to do is establish your USP (unique selling point). The handmade market is very saturated so it pays to be different, you’ll be able to establish a customer base and differentiate yourself from your competitors. So start by looking at what’s already out there, perhaps find what is missing in the marketplace and see if you can fill the gap.

Safety First

Make sure you understand the full safety requirements of whatever it is you want to sell. Some of the safety requirements include:

  • Nightdresses must be treated so that they conform to the flammability requirements of British Standard BS 5722. In the UK only nightdresses need to be flame retardant, in the USA all nightwear needs to be flame retardant. Be sure of where you are posting to and their regulations.
    Clothing made from stretch fabrics for babies is considered nightwear as babies sleep in them. They dont need to be fire retardant but do need a permanent visible label with red KEEP AWAY FROM FIRE in the correct font and size
  • Drawstring cord length – The legislation BS EN 14682 has very specific requirements about the length and placement of drawstring cord – we haven’t outlined them all here as vary depending on child’s age, garment and placement.
  • Ensure the fabrics used are chemically safe for children – Caboodle Textiles stock Oeko-Tex fabrics which are a must have for any business selling items for children.
  • Toys or items with play value (including fancy dress, capes etc) must be CE marked. The regulations on toy and on fancy dress are different so further research will be required for your specific product. The testing on these may change after Britain’s exit from the EU as Britain defines new regulation.
  • Choking hazards such as buttons or sequins etc. must be securely fastened and be able to withstand around 70kg of force to comply with legislation.
  • Your products must be labelled in accordance with the specific rules for the product type. For more information on labelling, check out UKFT
  • If you decide to sell cloth sanitary pads or reusable nappies to the USA or Canada, you need to be registered with their health authority prior to selling.

This is not an exhuastive list of safety requirements nor is it an authority statement of the law – please check with your local trading standards for advice specific to your business and products.

Tax & Insurance 

You must register with HMRC as self employed – whether you make -£100, £1 or £10,000, you must tell them. It’s very simple and straightforward, and quick and easy to do.

The very latest you can register with HMRC is by 5 October after the end of the tax year during which you became self-employed. For example, if you started your business in June 2019, you would need to register with HMRC by 5 October 2020. It doesn’t matter how much you make or whether you’ve made a loss, you must register.

HMRC do have a £1k trading allowance which means you may not need to fill in a self assessment form if your first year is under that threshold. However, you still need to report your intention to use your trading allowance to HMRC.

You will also need insurance, the specific type of insurance you’ll need depending on what and where you want to sell. Most small businesses need at a minimum Product Liability Insurance, Public Liability Insurance and Stock Liability Insurance. The insurance is there to protect yourself as well as protecting the customer. Ian Wallace Craft Insurance is a great starting point for craft businesses however may not cover those making to specific measurements. Another popular starting point is Direct Line Home Business Insurance. Do be sure to check with your specific insurer about their posting location coverages. Many insurers have restrictions on posting to the USA for example.

The Legal Bit

When you run a business there are several policies you need in place and to comply with. The first being  terms and conditions that comply with The Consumer Contract Regulations, these are your customers basic rights when purchasing online. The second is a privacy policy that complies with GDPR, this outlines how you handle, store and process customer data such as their name and address.

Both of the requirements for these documents are comprehensive and you can find out more information about the CCR’s here and GDPR here

It’s absolutely imperative you display your trading address on your website, social media and payment portals. This is a legal requirement. If you work from home and are uncomfortable about displaying your home address, you can purchase a PO box for that purpose.

You also must adhere to copyright laws, it is illegal in the UK to sell items made with copyrighted characters including Disney, Marvel, TV characters and much more. This includes making to sell with licenced fabric, the fabric is only licenced for personal use. It also includes “inspired” fabrics. You can find out more about UK Copyright Law here. USA and many EU countries such as France have different copyright laws so be sure to follow UK laws not hearsay.

Know Your Numbers

A key aspect to running a business is knowing your numbers. You need to be able to understand your gross profit, net profit, expenditure costs and working capital.

One of the ways you can be sure to make a good profit is buying your fabric in bulk such as Caboodle’s wholesale bolt offers or use the multi buy options on solids rather than ordering an individual metre.

These will all ensure you make money when running your business and will aid you in completing your tax return.

Getting Out There

Once you’ve nailed all of the above, it’s time to get out there. Think of a name, pick your platform (check out Virtual Bird’s guide to Etsy here), and get selling. You can then look at things like creating a mailing list, building campaigns and much more.

Check the name you want to use isn’t protected by trademarks or used by other companies in a similar field. It is upsetting to invest in building a brand to later get a cease and desist letter from a pre-existing company. Check the availability of your chosen name on the social platforms and domain name options you might want to use going forwards. It’s frustraiting to find your website unavailable when you come to want it down the line so preparation and research is the key here.

Don’t expect it to be an immediate success, sales will be slow whilst you build your audience but with some hard graft, you can make a success of this.

I hope this post has given you food for thought and lots of action steps to set up your business, should you need further support or advice, you can check out my blog here and sign up to my newsletter here to get 25 ways to boost your business.

Thank you so much to Mel for allowing me to share this with you,  good luck and have fun!

Posted on 2 Comments

Solid & Ribbing Colour Matching

Solid & Ribbing Colour Matching

Here at Caboodle Textiles we know what it’s like when you find the perfect print but aren’t sure what solids or ribbing go with it, similarly it can be frustrating to not know which solids colour match to which ribbing to ensure professionally finished garments.

We wanted to make that easier so we implemented a variety of ways you can find out which colours go with your fabric.

Sample Service

Our sample service allows you to purchase samples of our fabrics to match them with fabrics you already have at home and to check the colours, weight and feel of the fabric.

Simply visit the product you’d like to order a sample for and click the button. We do recommend you purchase your chosen fabric soon after recieving your sample to ensure the fabric you receive is from the same batch as your sample.

Product Add-Ons

We want to make it super simple for you to get everything you need at once, so we’ve added the complimentary solids and ribbing to the print listings.

 

In the majority of our product listings you can find coordinating and contrasting fabric information with a quick to click checkbox if you’d like to add the complimenting fabric to your order. Where possible we’ve included photographs of the fabric with the recommended colours, both as flat lays and made into a garment.

Colour Matching Ribbing

For a lot of sewists, having colour matched solid jersey and ribbing is a must have, and we’ve added a feature to help you understand which of our solids and ribbing matches.

On each listing, there is an accompanying section similar to the product add-ons that explains which of our solids and ribbing match. Sometimes it will say colour match, this means the jersey and the ribbing are the same shade. Sometimes it will highlight that the colour works or is complimentary but is not a direct colour match. Occasionally we’ll include contrasting colours if it has been a particularly popular combination.

Compare Products

When purchasing fabric it can often be helpful to compare fabrics, either to decide which you want or to find matching/ coordinating colours.

You can find out more about our compare products feature here

Contact Us

If you don’t see the information you need on the fabric listing, you can always get in touch and we can provide you with the information and then update it on our website for future reference.

We hope you enjoy these new features and if you wish the website did something it doesn’t already do, tell us! We want to make your shopping experience as exciting as the sewing!

Posted on Leave a comment

How to attach a neckband sewing tutorial

How to attach a neckband sewing tutorial

Today we bring you a fantastic video to help you learn how to attach a neckband.

You can watch our video here

Attaching a neckband when sewing is a really useful skill for any beginner because anything that needs a top half finishing such as dresses or t shirts or jumpers are all going to need neck bands unless you stick to hoodies for the rest of your life.

In the video, Nichola puts a neckband on the MBJM Explorer Raglan made from our Cotton Jersey Paint Splash and Candy Pink Cotton Jersey

As Nichola explains, you can either use Cotton Jersey or Ribbing for the neckbands, both have excellent stretch and return which is key when creating neckbands.

Caboodle recommends ribbing for beginners as it’s a lot more forgiving and you will find it easier to get the finish you want.

Remember, if you buy four items, so four half meters of any ribbing, or more, you’ll start to get multi buy discount, the more you buy, the cheaper it gets. There’s also a discount, specifically for first time buyers who are members of the MBJM sewing group on Facebook. (This coupon is not valid in conjunction with multi buy discount categories).

Cut your neckband to the dimensions it says in your pattern and sew together in a ring with right sides facing

Once the neck band is in a ring, open it out and folded it wrong sides together in half, so you’ve got a ring, that’s now half thickness. You’ve basically reduced the height of your neckband and hidden the seam you’ve just sewn.

Now you’re going to divide your neckline into four equal parts. We use wonder clips to do this as they’re easier to control than pins and you don’t end up poking yourself a hundred times!

Pop a clip at the seam, then fold in half and pop a clip exactly opposite. Then bring the clips together so they’re touching each other than at each end put another clip. Make sure the clips are on the raw edges – you can press if you want to add a bit more security.

Next you take your item – and the thing to remember with a t-shirt is that the back and the front are not equal.

For the placement of the seam on your garment, the easiest way as a beginner is to put the seam in the centre of the back – but it doesn’t matter because you’re the only one who will notice.

To find the four equal points of your garment, place the seam of your necklines and the sleeves meet each other. And that’s going to tell you where it’s diagonally opposite. Be really careful about making sure the garment is split into four equal parts as it will cause problems with the distribution of the stretch further in the tutorial. The reason you’re doing it like this is because you want that band to stretch evenly throughout all of the fabric. If you don’t do it like this, you will end up stretching one part more than the other. And that’s when it will start looking wonky, you’ll run out of neckband or it won’t lay flat.

This top shown here has the same neckline front and back as the child wearing the finished product likes to be able to wear it both ways around without worrying about the front and back. When doing this we cut between the  back and front height lines to keep the neck opening the correct size.

Now you need to match up the clips on your neckline with the clips on your garment, making sure the raw edges match. Combine all layers under one clip.

You can see the difference in size between the neck band and the main fabric here as the main fabric bags outwards when clipped.

When you’re a beginner, we suggest dividing it into eight and doing it that way just again so that you get a really even finish.

You can see the extra fabric is even between each clip.

Now you have your neckline pinned, you’ll see that the neckline is much shorter than the garment so as you are sewing you will want to stretch the neckband but not the garment – this is absolutely crucial otherwise you will overstretch the neckline and end up with a wobbly circle that wont sit flat.

You can sew your neckband on an overlocker or a sewing machine – use an overcast stitch, triple stretch or zig zag.

Practise on scraps first to ensure you’re completely comfortable before sewing for the first time on your garment.

It’s really important that you put the neckline part that you want to stretch on the underneath and the garment on top.

You can see the extra fabric is gathered on the sewers side of the clip.

This is then stretched out as the sewer prepares to remove the clip and feed in the next section.

Ensure your needle is fully down and in when stretching the next step or you can bend or snap your needle, pull on the ribbing or jersey, which is the bit that’s allowed to stretch. And you know how far to pull by the amount that the ribbing needs to stretch between where you’ve started, and the next clip.

Stretch the ribbing, and then just rest the garment on to the top so all the layers rest together.  Put your finger in the place of the clip so it holds the stretched ribbing and the garment together.  As you’re sewing and the feed dogs bring the material through, you’re going to keep those two points together where the neckline is stretched, but the garment isn’t.

And as that goes under the foot, you’re then going to do the next bit of fabric again use your bottom hand your right hand to stretch the ribbing, while the left hand or the top hand stabilises the jersey and keeps the two in the right place.

Keep going until you reach back to where you began and finish the seam.

Once you’ve finished, press the neckline to help any lines or puckers. You can top stitch your neckline if you wish to make the inside seam lay flat. This is personal preference. Sometime people choose to just topstitch between the back seams so the inside stitching lays flat for photographing the item. For really professional finishes you can apply binding to hide the back seam. We will cover that in another blog. Its not needed for most makers.

Remember, perseverance and practise makes perfect!

Don’t forget to share your neckbands (and other sewing!) in our Facebook group.

Happy Sewing

Posted on Leave a comment

Handmade Christmas Clothing Ideas

Handmade Christmas Clothing Patterns

Christmas will be upon us before we know it and it’s time to turn our attention to Christmas outfits! Our exclusive winter prints combined with MBJM patterns make for a great combination to craft outfits for day and nightwear.

Whether you follow the Christmas Eve box tradition, love matching Christmas outfits or just want to refresh their winter wardrobe, this blog will be the one for you.

Continue reading Handmade Christmas Clothing Ideas

Posted on 2 Comments

New White Net Wash Tests

We’re very excited to stock some brand new white netting and black netting

This breathable light weight fabric is great for making laundry bags, shopping bags and reusable fruit and veg weigh bags or even as a lining in sportswear jackets

Fibre Content: 100% Polyester

Weight: 104gsm

Width: 150 cm

Given the versatile nature of the net, we wanted to make sure it would withstand the multiple conditions that these types of products undergo and as such our fabulous brand rep Nicola made up 2 gorgeous bags and ran them through a variety of tests.

Nicola then proceeded to wash both bags to find out how they hold up at various temperatures. The first bag went in at 40 degrees.

As you can see, it came out pretty much the same as when it went in!

The second bag went in at 60 degrees.

At 60 degrees there was very slight shrinkage (less than half an inch), and no visible signs of any damage to the fabric

Nicola then put the bags through their paces and tumble dried one of them with her towels

In the words of Nicola “this fabric is pretty much indestructible” – she tumble dried them for an hour and they were absolutely fine!

We’re so pleased the white net performed so well in these tests, if you’d like to get some of your own, you can buy it here and get the black net here

Happy Sewing

Posted on Leave a comment

MBJM Pattern Showcase

Here at Caboodle Textiles we stock the fantastic Made By Jack’s Mums sewing patterns and our fantastic reps have been sewing a selection of them up so we thought we’d showcase them for you.

The Penny Pinny is a relaxed pinafore dress. It has either tie straps (which don’t need undoing in order to take the garment on and off) or traditional buckles. There are FIVE pockets for hiding all your stuff. There are two lengths – mini to sit above the knee and midi to cover the knee. A back split can be added to both lengths. This garment is made from our plaited lead baby cord.

The Four Seasons are a casual jersey pattern with 4 lengths to choose from: shortie, knee length, capri and full length. You can choose from a regular jersey waistband or a double height fold over waistband, faux drawstrings and two pocket sizes. This garment is made from our exclusive rainbow rockets jersey

The Beach Bummies are a super simple but hugely versatile pattern. It is perfect for loungewear, sleepwear, gymnastics, dancing and playing! This garment is made from our animal adventure triangles jersey

The High Kicks are are the perfect blend of stylish and comfortable. They have a slim-fitting design with the characteristic harem dropped-crotch. This garment is made from our exclusive rainbow rockets jersey

The Over It Alls are comfortable and quick to make. They are perfect for lounge wear or play clothing. The pattern goes right from prem./small newborn up to Age 12! There are long and short options, and the choice of a kanga pouch pocket or a semi-circle through pocket. They can be made semi-lined or fully lined/reversible. They can be made long or short. A snap crotch can be added to all sizes. This garment is made from our exclusive rainbow rockets jersey

Aren’t they all fantastic?! View our full range of MBJM patterns here and don’t forget to share your makes with Caboodle fabric and MBJM patterns in our Facebook group.

Happy sewing!

Posted on Leave a comment

What is the difference between Teddy and Sherpa?

What is the difference between Teddy and Sherpa?

We often get asked what the differences are between the two. It’s hard to tell from a product photo what those differences might be. So we will give you the simple steps to knowing what to expect when you order one of our fabrics.

Teddy :

Teddy as you would expect has a fluffy teddy bear surface. The fibres are tufty and soft. In the two tone varieties you can see the underside colour between the tufts of the main surface. Some people describe Teddy as sheep fabric due to the way the fibres appear.

This teddy has a cream two tone which shows at the base of the main light grey fibres.

The back of Teddy:

Teddy has an open weave construction where the fibres are attached to a honeycomb backing. The advantage of this is that the fabric is breathable. The disadvantage is that when you cut it you will find the fibres shed on the edges.

Sherpa :

Like Teddy, Sherpa has a soft surface which is tufty. The fibres are slightly shorter and more compact than the Teddy.

The fibres of Sherpa don’t separate when they move. This is due to the way the fabric is bonded at the back.

The back of Sherpa:

Sherpa has a fleece backing. The fibres are bonded together at the back into a soft fleece finish. This gives the fabric a warm soft touch on the reverse and can be worn against the skin. The nature of this backing reduces the amount of shedding when the fabric is cut.

Sherpa has a soft brushed backing

What is the same about Teddy and Sherpa:

Both fabrics have 2 way stretch. They have really great stretch in a horizontal direction but very little stretch vertically. Both can be machine washed cool, but do not tumble dry.

Both can be used for lining coats, hats, gloves. For backing scarves or blankets. Great for making cushions and soft furnishings.

Which should I choose?

That really is up to you. One is not better than the other. Sherpa is slightly more expensive and considered the more superior quality due to its construction but it really doesn’t matter which you go for. The only time it really matters is if you are wanting to make an item with the backing of the fabric exposed – in that case the Sherpa is the best choice. If you are making an item where the Teddy or Sherpa is backed against another fabric then it is only personal preference that will tell them apart.

Shop for Teddy and Sherpa by clicking here

Subscribe to our mailing list

If you’re happy to receive marketing communications by email, to this email address, please enter your email address below. This means you will receive regular marketing updates including freebies, special offers, news, patterns and advice.
You may unsubscribe and have the right to be forgotten at any time. * indicates required Email Address *

Posted on Leave a comment

Caboodle Textiles Brand Rep Search – Spring 2019

Brand Rep Search Now Open

Caboodle Textiles are once again opening up the search for customers to join our team.

We are looking for UK Based sewers / sewists / seamstresses, seammasters, tailors and fabric sculpters. Whatever your favourite name we are interested to hear from you.

We are looking for people to join the Brand Rep team for Feb, March and April.

Please read our terms and conditions before entering. You will be asked to sign and return them before receiving any fabrics.
http://caboodletextiles.co.uk/brand_rep_terms 

Continue reading Caboodle Textiles Brand Rep Search – Spring 2019

Posted on Leave a comment

Your consumer spending power can change the world

Your consumer spending power can change the world

It may feel like the clothes you make have no influence on the big sellers in the fashion industry but it really does make a difference.

When you choose to buy your own fabrics and treasure the items you make there is a ripple effect across the high street.

Continue reading Your consumer spending power can change the world